New house builds at lowest level since 1920s

The number of houses built in the last 12 months fell by 5 per cent compared to the previous year, according to government figures released today.

The number of houses built in the last 12 months fell by 5 per cent compared to the previous year, according to government figures released today.

There were 109,370 new homes built in the 12 months to 2013 and 122,590 new homes started.

Encouragingly, this represents a 23 per cent increase in the number of new homes built in 2013, but it comes from a very low base – starts remain 34 per cent and completions 41 per cent below their March 2007 level.

Commenting on the figures, Chartered Institute of Housing (CIH) chief executive Grainia Long said the figures were “further confimation that we are nowhere near tackling our national housing crisis”.

Labour’s shadow housing minister Emma Reynolds MP described the figures as “yet more evidence of the government’s failure to build the homes the country needs and failing to act on the cost-of-living crisis”.

“With the market beginning to recover, today’s increase in housing starts is welcome but the number of homes built over the past year is down five per cent compared with the year before,” she said.

Labour plans to increase house building to at least 200,000 a year by 2020. It was recently reported that housebuilding in Britain is now at the same level as it was in the 1920s.

Last year Left Foot Forward reported how it now takes first time buyers in their twenties saving half of their net income more than 10 years to put together a deposit for their first home; in London that figure rised to 24 years.

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