Poll suggests 2016 non-voters now favour Remain

Both 2016 non-voters and those too young to vote, favour Remain now

A poll of people who did not vote in the EU referendum in 2016 has shown a majority support having a second referendum and would vote Remain in it.

The poll of 1,125 people found that 60% want a public vote on the referendum deal and 68% would vote Remain if such a vote were held.

While they didn’t vote last time, 41% said they were certain, or near-certain, to vote in a fresh referendum on EU membership – and of these, 74% would vote for continued membership.

The poll was commissioned by For Our Future’s Sake. While they celebrated the result of the poll, they warned that it’s results should be treated with “a degree of caution”.

This is because nobody knows the demographics for sure of those who did not vote in 2016 – which makes it hard to weigh the sample.

Seperately, the pollsters talked to people who were too young to vote in 2016 but are old enough now.

Of these, 74% want a second referendum. Of those who say they are certain to vote in such a referendum, 87% say they would vote for Remain.

For our Future’s Sake’s Kira Lewis said:

“This polling shows what we already know – that with brexit yet to be decided, the two million young people who haven’t had their voices heard want a people’s vote, and to stay in the European Union.

Young people are rightly furious, watching older generations take our futures away from us, and we will be marching on 23rd March to demand a People’s Vote”

Joe Lo is a freelance journalist and a reporter for Left Foot Forward

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3 Responses to “Poll suggests 2016 non-voters now favour Remain”

  1. Chester Draws

    They didn’t vote last time. They won’t vote next time. That’s what non-voters do (don’t do).

    Hoping that non-voters will suddenly turn into voters is a triumph of hope over experience.

  2. Patrick Newman

    There was a clear but small majority in favour of the UK should ” leave the European Union”. I do not recall hearing anything about a Backstop, a two year transition period or a bill of £39bn at any time in the campaign. Furthermore, the 17.4M who voted to leave represents barely 35% of British Citizens. Further, furthermore much of the finance for the Leave campaign is still subject to legal challenge and evidence of corruption. Finally, in all likelihood, Parliament will be deadlocked over how the UK leaves the EU. A peoples’ vote seems to be the only way out but it is not clear what the mechanism is to achieve this. If there is an extension to the Article 50 there may be a way of introducing agreement across parties to have a new vote.

  3. Aura Wave Keto

    Just what I was looking for, thank you for posting.

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