Five things we learned from the Labour manifesto launch

What to expect from a Labour government

 

1) Labour will increase the minimum wage. Labour has committed itself to raising the minimum wage to at least £8 an hour by 2019. This has been brought forward a year – the party announced at conference last year that the minimum wage would hit £8 by 2020. “Labour is renewing our traditions as the party of work family and community,” said Ed Miliband at the launch. “We are also the party of equality.”

2) Labour will abide by a ‘Budget Responsibility Lock’. According to business secretary Chuka Umunna, “there are no spending commitments…that entail additional borrowing, capital or otherwise”. This is quite a big deal. Labour says that every policy in the manifesto is costed and will require no additional borrowing. The pledge not to borrow for capital spending (roads, housing, infrastructure) will disappoint many on the left, however. As will the refusal to rule out further cuts beyond 2016 – especially when the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) says Labour could meet its spending targets without more cuts after 2016.

3) Labour will introduce comprehensive childcare. Under a Labour government all primary schools would need to provide wrap-around childcare from 8am to 6pm in the form of breakfast clubs and other after-school activities. The manifesto says:

“We will introduce a legal guarantee for parents of primary school children to access wraparound childcare from 8am to 6pm through their local primary school.

“As well as helping parents, this will provide children with before and after-school clubs and activities, helping to raise their aspirations and attainment.”

4) Labour will introduce a ‘fully-funded rail fare freeze’. Commuters have been fleeced in recent years by rapidly rising ticket prices. On Friday the Conservatives announced a rail fare price freeze, the details of which we are yet to hear, and today Labour announced a “strict cap on every route for any future fare rises, and a new legal right for passengers will be created to access the cheapest ticket for their journey”.

The plan is expected to cost just over £200 million and will be funded by delaying road projects on the A27 and A358, according to Labour.

5) Labour will protect tax credits. Under Labour plans tax credits will rise in line with inflation from next year. Last year the chancellor George Osborne pledged a two-year freeze on benefits and tax credits if the Conservatives were re-elected.

James Bloodworth is the editor of Left Foot Forward. Follow him on Twitter

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30 Responses to “Five things we learned from the Labour manifesto launch”

  1. SonOfTheIsles

    1) £8 by 2020 – Under current year on year minimum wage growth the mimimum wage will be over £8 anyway.

    2) Saying and doing are two different things in the labour party. HIstorically a party that says one things and does another. When things start going tits-up they raid the treasury to pay off their friends before they get kicked out of No 10.

    3) A manifesto for another unrestrained baby boom. I guess that is why there is a green party for lefties who do understand over-population and sustainability.

    4) Mess with price discovery at your peril.

    5) Unaffordable.

    labour will last as long Hollande and probably as little as Syriza.

    Left Foot in Mouth.

  2. Jim Bennett

    Rather than make the cheap political points I usually do, could I ask a question? Miliband said he wouldn’t raise either the lower or higher personal tax rate. Does this mean no 50 pence tax rate for high earners or did I miss something?

  3. treborc1

    No Ball said and you have to smile at this one.

    I will not raise the top end of the tax, or the lower, no tax rises, well of course I will put it up to 50p .

    is that not then a tax rise.

  4. treborc1

    The Living wage has now gone dropped because well business did not like it, so Miliband says when firms can afford it, one day in the future.so Instead of rising the min wage to the level of the Living wage he offers us a rise of £8 in five years time I would say the Tories would meet that in three.

    No words for those unlucky to be unemployed because of the biggest bust in living memory, but that is labour for you.

  5. Jim Bennett

    I think I should go back to making cheap political points then!

  6. AlanGiles

    Miliband was in full “Auntie Tony” mode, with the pleading and preaching, sounding really “important” while he was busy re-arranging the deckchairs on the Titanic. No more convincing than the usual bumbling

  7. JAMES MCGIBBON

    Labour did introduce the minimum wage. Maybe some lefties would prefer we go back to 30 bob an hour to give them something to moan about. You do have to realise that some people actually have to pay wages to employees. Not everyone gets a public service payout.

  8. Liam Murphy

    Lower refers to the 20% rate
    Higher refers to the 40% rate
    What they did not exclude, was the Additional rate, for earners over £150k. This currently 45% and they have pledged to put it up to 50%

  9. Ratpen

    You weren’t there, then. He wasn’t “bumbling” at all.

  10. Ratpen

    Biggest BANKERS bust.

  11. AlanGiles

    Reread. I said “the usual bumbling” which is what he normally does. Today it was a “gravitas” day, like the Queen of New Labour, Blair – but it still sounded forced and phoney – hell yes!

  12. Ratpen

    Perhaps you could regail us with George’s Osborne’s economic miracles and the glories of the ‘long-term economic plan’? Worst recovery after recession; more borrowing in 5 years than Labour’s 12; double- dip recession; nowhere near paying off deficit after pledge that he would; boom in zero hours contracts; lowest investment in technology in developed world; highest rates of inequality in EU; no ‘march of the makers’; return of house price bubble; debt fueled consumer ‘boom’; increased in child poverty; entrenchment of City of London power; stagnating wages; massive household debt; banks teetering on brink of another debt-based derivative collapse.

  13. uglyfatbloke

    In the days of £ s. and d 30 bob and hour (£1.50) would have been an exceptional wage. In 1973 I was getting 2.50 a day and beer was about 17p a pint.

  14. uglyfatbloke

    I’d be a bit more impressed if the Additional Rate was to be applied at something around 70k rather than 150k and the tax threshold put up to to 12k. Tax yield would n’t really change much, but the poorest would have a considerable (cumulative) amount to income that would virtually be spent straight back into the economy.

  15. sarntcrip

    NEW LABOUR IS GONE THANK GOD TORY BLAIR INTRODUCED A NON LIVING MINIMUM WAGE WHICH MANY OF CAMERON’S BUDDIES TILL FAIL TO PAY

  16. sarntcrip

    ORDINARY PEOPLE HAVE AN INFINITELY BETTER CHANCE OF BEING TREATED WITH RESPECT BY A LABOUR GOVERNMENT THAN A TORY ONE WHO CUT WORKERS RIGHTS ENCOURAGES THE IMPOSITION OF ZERO HOURS CONTRACTS WHILE CUTTING TAXES FOR BILLIONAIRES AND PURPOSELY FAILED TO CLOSE TAX LOOPHOLES USED BY BIG BUSINESS AND THE VERY VERY WEALTHY INSTEAD PICKING ON THOSE WHO CAN’T FIGHT BACK LIKE BUT THEN UNSCRUPULOUS BULLIES WOULD DO THAT
    SORRY CAPS LOCK ERROR

  17. sarntcrip

    the 50 p tax rate is something of a red herring few on paye pay it and the other wealthy have tax accountants to take full advantage of tax loopholes ed may well not close those but he is infinitely more likely to than the tory banksters party

  18. Gerschwin

    Do you not have a ‘caps lock’ button or is this your standard tantrum mode?

  19. Gerschwin

    Article ain’t about Osborne it’s about the Labour manifesto silly.

  20. Leon Wolfeson

    Rachel Reeves disagrees with what you said.

  21. Leon Wolfeson

    Why do the middle class need another tax cut, again?

  22. Leon Wolfeson

    And you’re not very convincing as anything but a Tory.

  23. Leon Wolfeson

    Yes, and you object to paying people, right. You’d rather get even more of a payout from the taxpayer. How many people do you have on workfare?

  24. Leon Wolfeson

    1. Yes, you must be happy.
    2. Keep making up nonsense
    3. No, what raises childbirth rates is poverty. #butfacts
    4. There is none in the current rail system
    5. So protecting even the most basic of protections for workers is “unaffordable”, British workers shouldn’t bother eh?

    I’m no Labourite, but your rant is weak. And you’re not a left winger, foot-in-mouth man.

    Hollande’s issue was waffling and not carrying through. That may indeed be Labour’s issue, but then you go off on a different rant. Syrzia is doing fine – the problem is brinkmanship from some of Europe’s terrified right wingers.

  25. JAMES MCGIBBON

    That is about right 20 new p was the price of a pint in my club. Get half pissed for a pound!

  26. JAMES MCGIBBON

    I do not pay people but the people have paid me whilst being in the public service and producing nothing but bluster and wind. I should have been a politician. Still time!

  27. Leon Wolfeson

    Ah. So, people “paid you” rather than you paying them. Oh, you’re a contractor, and you call the plans you get “bluster and wind”.

    Are you in IT, doing “agile” for the government?

  28. JAMES MCGIBBON

    Leon are you on the Port and Lemon tonight! and reminising about your poor uncle and the ice pick?

  29. Guest

    No, I’m not you.

  30. JAMES MCGIBBON

    Fine.

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