Economic gloom is killing Britons’ sense of common interest

Anne Summers reports on the results of the 28th British Social Attitudes Survey.

 

Anne Summers is the communications manager for NatCen Social Research

The 28th British Social Attitudes report publishes today. The report arrives at a difficult time: increased economic gloom, and in the wake of the public’s faith in a number of pillars of the establishment stretched to breaking point.

What effect has this had on the British psyche? NatCen Social Research’s interviewers have spent an hour in the homes of more than 3,000 people to find out.

There are glimpses of some important shifts. Overall, there are signs that British society is looking increasingly inward: we’re becoming a bit more individualistic, and less likely to look to see government as the solution to society’s problems’. If we’re right about this trend, there is a risk of increasing polarisation between the haves and have-nots over time.

People continue to think the gap between rich and poor is too wide, but they are not up for redistributing wealth as a result.

Many continue to believe that unemployment benefits are too high, and that they discourage people from finding work. And in a new module on child poverty, while we see real concern, people also believe that more than anything, the root cause of child poverty is poor parenting. So some tough attitudes on display.

This theme combines with evidence that self-reliance doesn’t equate to a sense of common interest.

In another new module, we see that pretty much everyone accepts the need to build more homes. But almost half are resistant to new homes in their own area: particularly in the South East (where need is greatest), and particularly among those who already own their own homes.

We’re also seeing less willingness to make financial sacrifices to safeguard the environment through higher prices or taxation. And in an interesting shift, people are less opposed to the better-off paying for health care. (Although we have not seen this shift in Scotland).

In tough times, society could do with more belief in its leaders; but in practice we see democracy under continued pressure.

This is particularly evident among the young, less well off, and among ethnic minorities. We’re seeing a long term decline in the belief in the duty to vote; fewer than one half of younger people voted in the last election; and the television debates only really appealed to people already interested in politics.

Why should we care? Because we may see society polarised and weakened as some prove much better equipped at self reliance and self interest than others.

If the government is hoping for the big society to solve problems, then we’re only half way there. Self reliance is part of the story: but a strong society requires people to look outwards too. And it requires people to believe in its leaders.

See also:

Immigration policy should support UK economic growth, not undermine itRuth Grove-White, December 5th 2011

Borrowing more to borrow less may not be political suicideLeo Barasi, December 5th 2011

Look Left – Workers prepare to fight slasher OsborneShamik Das, November 25th 2011

Message to Cameron: Talk to us, not TV newsSally Hunt, November 25th 2011

New survey shows public more willing to take action over pensionsNeil Foster, November 21st 2011

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32 Responses to “Economic gloom is killing Britons’ sense of common interest”

  1. Political Planet

    Economic gloom is killing Britons’ sense of common interest: Anne Summers reports on the results of the 28th Bri… http://t.co/tkiY8ozp

  2. Alex Braithwaite

    RT @leftfootfwd: Economic gloom is killing Britons' sense of common interest http://t.co/CwkLp72x

  3. Katy Wright

    Depressing but undoubtedly true: Economic gloom does not equal "blitz spirit" but "every man for themselves". http://t.co/rs01QOVe

  4. Anonymous

    Overall, there are signs that British society is looking increasingly inward: we’re becoming a bit more individualistic, and less likely to look to see government as the solution to society’s problems

    ====

    Yep. They have realised that government is the problem, the cause of most of societies ills, and not the solution to anything.

    ====
    Many continue to believe that unemployment benefits are too high, and that they discourage people from finding work
    ====

    Interview lots of people on benefits, and they will confirm that view.

    ====
    In tough times, society could do with more belief in its leaders; but in practice we see democracy under continued pressure.
    ====

    Destroyed by them stealing money. Why haven’t the 52% who committed fraud and paid back money been prosecuted? Because they have looked after themselves. ie. It’s pretty clear they are in it for your money.

    What about democracy? Labour, Lib Dems and the Tories promised a referenda or spun it to imply that there would be one which is deceitful at best. They then refuse to allow the electorate a say.

    With no democratic say, the public will conclude we have no responsibility. You lied. You didn’t ask us. We are not responsible for the consequences.

    ====
    his is particularly evident among the young, less well off, and among ethnic minorities. We’re seeing a long term decline in the belief in the duty to vote;
    ====

    Why are you surprised? You just asking them to select the next thief in Westminster, not to make a decision on anything.

    ====
    Why should we care? Because we may see society polarised and weakened as some prove much better equipped at self reliance and self interest than others.
    ====

    Yep, that is your legacy. It’s a direct result of your policies when you were in power and had a opportunity to do something about it.

  5. Richard Exell

    Economic gloom is killing Britons' sense of common interest, writes @natcen's Anne Summers: http://t.co/Ree5KDBe

Comments are closed.