Harman’s first international development speech outlines six key priorities

This morning, shadow international development secretary Harriet Harman gave a speech at ActionAid headquarters in London. Marking International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women, Ms Harman outlined six priorities for the future of international development.

Tim Nicholls is the blog editor of the Labour Campaign for International Development (LCID)

This morning, shadow international development secretary Harriet Harman gave a speech at ActionAid headquarters in London. Marking International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women, Ms Harman outlined six key priorities for the future of international development:

1. Realising the 0.7 per cent GNP pledge for aid;

2. Strengthening women’s rights around the world;

3. Support for remittances (money sent by people in developed countries to their family members in their country of origin);

4. Trade, tax and global growth;

5. The role of development in conflict prevention; and

6. Meeting the needs of developing countries in the fight against climate change.

It was that first point that Ms Harman concentrated on to make a direct call to the government:

“We cannot have succeeded in the struggle to have a new UN women’s agency only to discover that its governing board is men. That would be to contradict everything that it stands for.

“And the executive board should reach out beyond women in the UN missions and women in governments and include women in civil society organisations.”

In order to achieve this and to ensure the UK’s position as a world leader in women’s rights, Ms Harman decried the fact that among the Department for International Development and Foreign and Commonwealth Office ministerial teams, there was not a single woman.

She said:

“We [Labour] are calling on the Government to make a ministerial appointment of a woman to carry on the work that Glenys Kinnock was doing when we were in government – a role you campaigned for. She led the UK’s work on tackling violence against women overseas and she did a great job.

“The first time such an appointment had been made in the UK. That was important leadership and the government must continue it.”

Well, the government must have been half listening as Home Office minister Lynne Featherstone has, just today, had ‘International Violence Against Women Champion’ added to her brief. Potentially stopping well short of what Ms Harman called for, there is little indication as yet as to what authority Ms Featherstone will have, nor what resources she will have at hand to make a difference to the lives of women across the world.

On remittances, Ms Harman drew on the experiences of many in her constituency, including a report she compiled in 2007:

“I call them the ‘hidden heroes of international development’. People living in my constituency who come from Sierra Leone, Nigeria or Ghana who are living here and working hard bringing up their families. Sometimes doing more than one job, like office cleaning.

“As well as paying their taxes and providing for their family, they also send money back to their home country… But I think we can and should do much more to support remittances.”

It was clear from the passion in her speech that Ms Harman looks determined to make a difference in her new role. Before the election, there was cross-party consensus on the enshrining of the 0.7 per cent law; it was now Labour’s role, she said, to press the coalition to ensure that this Bill is put before Parliament. In a time where the government seems to turn with the tide, Labour:

“… doesn’t want to risk this being the next promise abandoned.”

Left Foot Forward has previously written about a worrying lack of ambition, ideas or leadership emanating from the coalition on international development. With these six points, Harriet Harman has once again demonstrated that Labour is providing leadership on this issue – the focus on trade, tax and global growth is therefore particularly welcome, and LCID looks forward to hearing more on the shadow team’s proposals.

9 Responses to “Harman’s first international development speech outlines six key priorities”

  1. Richard Angell

    RT @leftfootfwd: Harman’s first international development speech outlines six key priorities: //bit.ly/gVLlgV writes @Tim_Nicholls

  2. Tim Nicholls

    RT @leftfootfwd: Harman’s first international development speech outlines six key priorities: //bit.ly/gVLlgV writes @Tim_Nicholls

  3. David Taylor

    RT@leftfootfwd @tim_nicholls: @HarrietHarman first international development speech outlines six key priorities //bit.ly/gp1tit

  4. Malcolm Evison

    RT @leftfootfwd: Harman’s first international development speech outlines six key priorities //bit.ly/gp1tit

  5. barb milne

    RT @leftfootfwd: Harman’s first international development speech outlines six key priorities: //bit.ly/gVLlgV writes @Tim_Nicholls

  6. janie_s

    On point 2.

    “The fact that in Mohammedan law every woman must belong to some man as his absolute property – either as a child, a wife, or a concubine – must delay the final extinction of slavery until the faith of Islam has ceased to be a great power among men.”
    (Winston Churchill)

  7. Jonathan Tench

    RT @leftfootfwd: Harman’s first international development speech at actionaid outlines six key priorities //bit.ly/gp1tit

  8. Jiesheng

    Lack of ideas also describes Labour development policy which was still neo-liberal–check with Ha-Joon chang for that.

  9. janie_s

    Maybe Harman could give 0.7 % of her wealth to good causes and LEAVE ME THE F*CK ALONE I’M 40 AND HAVEN’T BOUGHT MY FIRST HOUSE YET YOU C*NT

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