Polling puts Labour ahead as Tories tumble

Just 21 per cent of people believe that George Osborne is doing a good job

 

When ICM’s poll for the Guardian earlier this week put Labour and the Conservatives on a level footing on 36 per cent each, many — basically everyone — declared it to be a fluke.  But a new poll out today suggests it might not have been.

According to the data compiled by YouGov for the Times, Labour are now ahead of the Tories, albeit within the margin of error. Asked how they would vote, 34 per cent of respondents said Labour, compared to 33 per cent who said Conservative.

Asked if they felt George Osborne was doing a good job, 45 per cent said no, while just 21 per cent said yes.

49 per cent believe that the economy is being managed badly, while 38 per cent think it’s being well looked after. 38 per cent believe the UK economy will get worse over the next year. Just 14 per cent expect it to improve.

Amid ongoing rumours of Conservative civil war over proposed changes to Personal Independence Payment, 70 per cent of respondents said that proposals to reduce the entitlement to disability benefits for people who need to use an aid or appliance for daily tasks was simply the wrong priority within the budget.

59 per cent also feel that it is a wrong priority to make all primary and secondary schools into academies by 2020. Just 14 per cent feel that it is a good idea.

41 per cent feel that the Government’s spending cuts to reduce the deficit are bad for the economy, marginally ahead of the 33 per cent who support them.  57 per cent feel the cuts are being made unfairly.

Given all the focus of late on Government efforts to support home ownership, 25 per cent of people feel Labour is best placed to help people onto the housing ladder compared to 22 per cent who say the same about the Conservatives. But Labour still trails significantly behind the Conservatives on who is best placed to look after the economy.

Labour do however lead the Conservatives on who would improve living standards and who would reduce the number of people in poverty.

Ed Jacobs is a contributing editor at Left Foot Forward

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