How hidden cameras bring human rights violators to justice

Intimidation and harassment of women thrive in atmospheres where perpetrators feel they can act with impunity.

Intimidation and harassment of women thrive in atmospheres where perpetrators feel they can act with impunity

Intimidation and harassment of women thrive in atmospheres where perpetrators feel they can act with impunity. In the world’s most dangerous places, there is no recourse to justice, and the people persecuting you – the police, the courts, the government – are the very people who are supposed to protect you. The only defence you have is the truth.

Videre, a group co-founded by Israeli former soldier Oren Yakobovich, has a mission to help people get the truth out.

The organisation provides training, technology, and support for people around the world. Tiny concealed cameras help local activists and journalists to record sexual harassment and other human rights abuses: Videre helps verify the recordings and distribute them across the world, via traditional and new media.

By its nature, the organisation must remain secretive. Yakobovich is the only member of staff identified on Videre’s website. But in a recent TED talk, he gave an insight into how the organisation works, showing how the organisation secured footage of intimidation and violence, and used it to bring about change. It’s a fascinating, engaging glimpse into a new kind of activism.

Sign up to learn more about Videre here.

Mike Harris is director of 89up

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